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Boston Early Music Festival:

Tuesday, June 11, 2013 at 5pm

Symphonie des Dragons
Gonzalo X. Ruiz, director

Au Goût du Soldat: Refining Regimental Music in France and Germany
New England Conservatory's Jordan Hall

Symphonie des Dragons brings together many of America’s finest wind players under the direction of Gonzalo X. Ruiz—BEMF’s principal oboist, professor at Juilliard, and one of the world’s most acclaimed practitioners of the instrument. This exciting program traces the civilizing influence of the oboe band on military and ceremonial music between 1680 and 1720, from simple marches and field music, through the more refined martial works of the Philidor manuscript and Lully, to the fully realized masterworks of Krieger, Fasch, and Zelenka. A full complement of oboes and bassoons—with doubling on recorders—rounded out by guitar and percussion makes this an ensemble unlike any other ever heard at BEMF.

Gonzalo X. Ruiz, Debra Nagy, Kathryn Montoya, Priscilla Smith, Kristin Olson, Cameron Kirkpatrick, Luke Conklin, Stephen Bard, Samuel Budish, Aaron Reichelt, & Jeanine Krause, oboe & recorder; Nate Hagelson, Dominic Teresi & Rachel Begley, bassoon; Charles Weaver, guitar

PROGRAM

Suite in G from the Philidor Collection
Suite in F from the Philidor Collection
Suite in C from the Philidor Collection
La Marche Suisse
Marche des Pompes Funebres de Mademoiselle la Dauphine par Mr. Paisible (The Queen’s Farewell)
Marche de Savoye fait par Mr. de Lully

Anonymous: Pomerisches Chaconne
Handel: Trio Sonata in G minor, Op. 2, No. 5
Krieger: First Suite from Die Lustige Feldmusik, 1704
Suite in D from the Philidor Collection

Symphonie des Dragons

"[Ruiz is] a master of expansive phrasing, lush sonorities and deft passagework."

San Francisco Examiner